Seedling Order

Conservation Forestry Program


Tree and shrub seedlings for development of wildlife habitat, windbreaks and many other uses.  Order deadline is March 23, 2018. 

Certain species will run out so please order early. 

The Lower Platte South NRD sells seedling trees and shrubs in bulk to cooperating landowners.

The minimum order is 25. Species are sold in bundles of 25 (except if ordering packages) and therefore must be ordered in increments of 25.

All trees and shrubs are $0.85 each for orders of 25 - 75 seedlings and $0.80 each for orders of 100 seedlings or more.

Trees ordered will be delivered directly to the NRD office and stored in our custom-made tree cooler.

It is up to the cooperator to retrieve their trees after receiving notification around mid-April.

The earlier you pick up your trees from our tree cooler and plant them, the better their survival rate will be.

Please visit www.lpsnrd.org for additional information and a hard copy of our order form or click here

For additional questions, please feel free to contact the NRD Forester at (402) 476-2729 or jseaton.forester@lpsnrd.org

If ordering 100 or more seedlings, be sure to check the box under EACH SPECIES in order to receive discount.

Deciduous - Hardwoods i.e. Trees with Leaves

Item Name Subtotal

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Amur Maple

A tall shrub or small tree native to northern Asia. Subject to chlorosis on heavy alkaline soils, and susceptible to 2,4-D injury. Popular as a small, multi-stemmed specimen tree. Outstanding bright reddish fall colors are influenced by soil conditions and the cultivar grown. Soil Texture - Adaptable to a variety of soils, except alkaline or poorly-drained soils. Water: Prefers moist, well-drained soils. Moderately drought tolerant. Light: Full sun to partial shade

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American Linden

A medium to large tree native to eastern Nebraska. Desirable as a landscape tree for its large stature, shade and aromatic flowers. Fruit with attached pale-green bract, gives tree a two-tone appearance in late summer. Soil Texture - Grows best in rich, moist, well-drained soils, but adapts to a wide range of soil types. Water: Drought tolerant, but prolonged drought stress predisposes trees to pests. Tolerant of infrequent, short duration flooding during the growing season. Light: Full sun to partial shade.

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Apple, spp.

Generic Apple tree suited for wildlife habitat plantings. Producing smaller apples, will need multiple for pollination.

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Black Cherry

Native trees are 38 m tall; bark of larger trunks fissured and scaly, but thin. Leaves: alternate, simple, ovate to oblonglanceolate, 5-15 cm long, 2.5-5 cm wide, with finely toothed margins, glabrous or commonly with reddish hairs along the midrib beneath, near the base. Inflorescence is an oblong-cylindric raceme that is 10-15 cm long at the end of leafy twigs of the season, with numerous flowers; calyx tube of short lobes, petals 5, white. Fruits: berry-like, about 8-10 mm in diameter, obovoid, black when ripe; seed a single, black, ovoid stone 6-8 mm long. The common name is from the black color of the ripe fruits.

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Black Walnut

Black walnut is native to Nebraska's eastern and north central fertile bottomlands. It is highly prized for its rich, chocolate-brown wood and nut meats. Straight, limb-free trees are very valuable in the timber industry. Walnut trees have a medium growth rate and a long life span. Walnut requires a deep, silty-loam soil having good internal drainage for maximum growth. Walnut seedlings have been planted in the Sandhills for wildlife habitat and as a local source of nut meats. Soil Texture - Sensitive to soil conditions. Does best on deep, well-drained, fertile, loamy soils. Water: Prefers moist well-drained soils. Does not withstand extended ponding or drought. Light: Full sun, tolerates partial shade.

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Bur Oak

Bur oak is native to Nebraska. It grows on a wide variety of sites, but grows best on rich, moist bottomlands. Bur oak has a slow to moderate growth rate and is fairly drought tolerant. It is an excellent species to include in wildlife habitat plantings. It is less susceptible to oak wilt than northern red oak and has no serious insect problems. Oaks may have to be protected from deer when young. Water: Drought tolerant, but prefers moist well-drained soils. Light: Full sun preferred, but is moderately shade tolerant.

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Catalpa 'Northern'

A medium-sized tree with a short trunk and several large, ascending branches and a narrow, rounded crown. The height at 20 years is about 20 feet. Catalpas prefer moist, deep, well drained soil, but adapts to dry or wet soils. The soil pH may range from 5.5 to 7.0. It prefers an open sunny space to partial shade. This tree comes into leaf very late in the spring and it is one of the first to lose its leaves in the fall. Its longevity is about 60 years.

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Cottonwood 'Native'

Cottonwood is the Nebraska state tree. It is native across the state and usually is found adjacent to rivers, streams, and around lakes. Cottonwood has a fast growth rate and provides most of the lumber processed in Nebraska today. It is planted in riparian areas for filter strips, and near streams to reduce sedimentation and stabilize stream banks. It also can be used in multiple row windbreaks for height and quick protection. Water: Requires a moist site. Tolerates drought on upland sites with high water table. Light: Requires full sun.

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Freeman Maple

Acer x freemanii, is a combination of the best qualities of Red Maple and Silver Maple. With the rich fall color of a Red Maple and the growth rate & hardiness of a Silver Maple, this tree will make an excellent addition to any landscape. Photo by: K. Zuzek, UMN Extension

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Hackberry

A good replacement tree for the American Elm because of its similar form and adaptability. Gray, unique stucco-like bark. Soil Texture - Performs well on a variety of soils. Water: Moderately drought tolerant but does best on moist, well-drained sites. May compensate for droughty conditions by dropping a portion of the leaves when under stress. Light: Full sun to partial shade

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'Manchurian' Apricot

Small fast-growing tree. Rounded, spreading form, winter-hardy, and drought resistant. Native to Manchuria and Korea. Attractive white flowers, golden orange fall color and edible fruit. Early flowering makes fruit production susceptible to spring frost damage. Soil Texture - Grows best in loam soils. Water: Moderately drought tolerant. Will not withstand ponding or saturated soils. Light: Full sun.

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'Manchurian' Crabapple

Midwest Manchurian crabapple is a moderately rapid growing medium-size tree. It is densely branched and oval shaped. This tree is extremely winter hardy and disease resistant, making it well suited to the harsh climatic extremes of the upper Midwest and Great Plains. Midwest may reach a height of 20 feet in 16 years. The dense and rounded growth form is very desirable. When planted in single-row windbreaks and given sufficient growing room, it maintains its branches close to the ground. It is one of the earliest species to leaf out in the spring and is fully leafed before blooming. The blossoms are snowy white.

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Northern Red Oak

The northern red oak grows to a height of 60–75' and a spread of around 45' at maturity with height increases of more than 24" per year. Full sun is the ideal condition for this tree, meaning it should get at least 6 hours of direct, unfiltered sunlight each day. The northern red oak grows in acidic, loamy, moist, sandy, well-drained and clay soils. While it prefers normal moisture, the tree has some drought tolerance and can be expected to grow in Hardiness Zones 3–8.

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Paper Birch

Paper birch is a medium sized deciduous tree, reaching 50 – 60 feet tall at maturity. It is a shallow rooted species with bright yellow fall color and striking white, flaky bark which references its name ‘paper’. It can be single stemmed or multi-stemmed.

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Quaking Aspen

Quaking aspen is a medium to tall deciduous tree, reaching 50 to 80 feet tall at maturity. It has a smooth white bark with distinguishing black marks that stand out on any landscape. The leaves have a flattened petiole that when the wind blows gives the leaves a ‘quaking’ look. They are beautiful additions to the landscape, giving a home a ‘mountain top’ feel.

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Silver Maple

A medium to large tree with spreading branches forming a variably rounded to informally spreading crown. A fast-growing tree subject to iron and manganese chlorosis on high pH soils which may cause dieback or eventual death. Often called soft maple because the wood is the softest of the maples used for lumber. Soil Texture - Performs poorly on tight clay soils. Water: Susceptibility to drought, winter stem dieback, sunscald injury and chlorosis affected by genetic variability and original seed source. Light: Full sun.

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Swamp White Oak

Swamp white oak is a striking tree with attractive peeling bark, especially on young trees. The lustrous, lobed leaves have a two-tone appearance, dark green on top with a silvery-white underside. Fall color is an orangeish-gold to yellow in mid-autumn. An excellent shade tree for any landscape. Tree & Plant Care: One of the easiest oaks to transplant and more tolerant of poor drainage than other oaks. Avoid high pH soils or plants develop chlorotic (yellowing ) leaves. Tolerant of black walnut toxicity, salt, drought and heat. Prune oaks in the dormant season to avoid attracting beetles that may carry oak wilt.

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