Seedling Order

Conservation Forestry Program


Tree and shrub seedlings for development of wildlife habitat, windbreaks and many other uses.  Order deadline is March 23, 2018. 

Certain species will run out so please order early. 

The Lower Platte South NRD sells seedling trees and shrubs in bulk to cooperating landowners.

The minimum order is 25. Species are sold in bundles of 25 (except if ordering packages) and therefore must be ordered in increments of 25.

All trees and shrubs are $0.85 each for orders of 25 - 75 seedlings and $0.80 each for orders of 100 seedlings or more.

Trees ordered will be delivered directly to the NRD office and stored in our custom-made tree cooler.

It is up to the cooperator to retrieve their trees after receiving notification around mid-April.

The earlier you pick up your trees from our tree cooler and plant them, the better their survival rate will be.

Please visit www.lpsnrd.org for additional information and a hard copy of our order form or click here

For additional questions, please feel free to contact the NRD Forester at (402) 476-2729 or jseaton.forester@lpsnrd.org

If ordering 100 or more seedlings, be sure to check the box under EACH SPECIES in order to receive discount.

Shrubs

Item Name Subtotal

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American Plum

The wild plum is a native tall shrub to small tree which is thorny, winter-hardy, and thicket- forming. Edible fruit used to make preserves and jellies. Water: Fair to good drought tolerance. Light: Full sun to partial shade.

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Chokeberry 'McKenzie'

McKenzie or black chokeberry is a deciduous shrub which can grow to a height of 3 to 12 feet tall. The black chokeberry grows well in full sunlight, but is moderately tolerant of shade. The best growth and fruit production occurs on low moist but well-drained sites, in full sun. It is not drought-tolerant. New shoots will grow up around established plants, filling in the space between plants like a hedgerow. Some of these shoots are the result of layering.

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Chokecherry

Chokecherry is a medium/large-sized shrub that forms a dense thicket from root suckers. It is used for the outer row in multi-row windbreaks. Chokecherry is good wildlife habitat, providing food and cover for birds and small mammals. Showy white flowers bloom in April or May, and the cherries ripen during July. The cherries can be used for making jelly and wine.

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Cotoneaster "Centennial"

Centennial cotoneaster grows to a mature height of 8 to 12 feet in 15 years. Crown width is 12 to 15 feet. The large quantities of bright rosey-red berries mature in early August and contrast strikingly with the deep-colored foliage.

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Elderberry

Native shrubs growing 2-4(-8) m tall, less commonly small single-stemmed trees, young twigs soft and pithy but the wood hard; bark thin, grayish to dark brown, irregularly furrowed and ridged. They can tolerate different conditions like soil that is in poor condition or soil that is too wet. One thing growing elderberries cannot tolerate, however, is drought.

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Hazelnut

American hazelnut is native to eastern Nebraska. Best growth is obtained on moist, fertile loam soils and can grow to 15 feet, but 8 to 10 feet is more common. It is medium to fast growing, and starts producing nuts within 3 to 5 years. The nuts mature in late summer to early fall and are very tasty if you can collect them before the birds and animals.

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Juneberry (Serviceberry)

A hardy, medium to tall, suckering shrub, native to prairie hillsides and woody draws. Also called Saskatoon and Serviceberry. Fruits are highly prized for food. Soil Texture - Prefers loam to sandy loam soil high inorganic matter. Water: Needs adequate moisture to bear fruit. Limited drought tolerance, does not withstand ponding. Light: Full sun to partial shade.

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Lilac 'Common'

Common lilac is a suckering, upright medium-tall shrub that is best located in the outside row of windbreaks. Fragrant white to lavender flowers bloom during May. Lilac is rarely used in wildlife plantings since it does not form thickets and the seeds have little food value.

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Nanking Cherry

A winter hardy, moderately fast-growing, medium shrub. Broad spreading, densely twiggy, becoming more open and picturesque with age. Also called Manchu cherry. Edible fruits are dark red and excellent for pies and jellies. Fruit is relished by many songbirds. Provides nesting cover for a few species of songbirds.

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Redosier Dogwood

An open, spreading, multi-stemmed, medium to large shrub with horizontal branches at the base. Freely stoloniferous as it spreads by natural layering of lower, relatively prostrate stems. Dark, blood-red bark provides winter color. Water: Grows best in moist to somewhat wet loams. Light: Full sun to partial shade.

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Silver Buffaloberry

A tall, thorny, thicket-forming native shrub. Well adapted to dry, moderately alkaline and saline soils. Tolerates infertile soils, in part because of its ability to fix and assimilate atmospheric nitrogen. Berries used for jellies. Water: Drought tolerant. Not adapted to wet, poorly-drained sites. Light: Full sun

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Skunkbush Sumac

Native to the Northern Plains. Spreading shrub, smaller and finer-textured leaves than Fragrant Sumac. Forms a dense mass of stems and leaves. Scented leaves and light yellow flowers. Soil Texture - Adapted to a variety of soils. Water: Moderately drought tolerant. Light: Full sun, to partial (1/2 to 3/4) shade.

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